log in
sign up or:

with google or facebook

or

By using this site you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service

forgot password?

What Kind of Pool Cue Should I Buy?

Wondering what kind of pool cue you should buy?

The pool cue is one of the most important part of shooting pool. The cue's importance shouldn't be overlooked when you are buying a new one.

This article explores what you should look for when buying a new pool cue. It should help you decide what kind of pool cue to buy,


What Kind of Pool Cue Should I Buy?

Pool Cue Weight

The weight of a pool cue is an important piece of how the cue feels and plays. Most good cues will have a weight between 18 and 21 ounces. In general, folks prefer a cue that is lighter rather than heaver; typically around 19 or 20 ounces. If you choose a cue that weighs more than this, you can almost bet it’s not going to be a good cue to play with.

With that said, heavy pool cues (known as "clubs") do serve a key purpose - and that purpose is to be a break cue. Many pool players have one cue that they use only for breaking and a completely different cue for playing. This is quite common for high end players.

Some people do tend to prefer a heavy cue for breaking due to the fact that the power in the breaking motion comes from the momentum of the cue through the ball and therefore through your arm delivering it. If you utilize a very light cue it is much easier to deliver a controlled break shot, but there won’t be any weight behind it.

On the alternate side, a cue that is quite heavy will prevent you from delivering any speed. Therefore, it’s often best to go with a cue that is somewhere in the middle range of the two and capable of delivering good momentum but still light enough that weight can be delivered as well.

Pool Cue Length

When it comes to length, it is important to understand that standard cues run 57 inches in length. Some people prefer shorter length cues while still others insist on longer length cues. If you’re just starting out you may want to do a little experimentation with several different lengths to find out which one works better for you. As a general rule of thumb; however, if you are of average height a standard length cue should work just fine.

Pool Cue Joint Types

You also need to give some thought to the types of joints the cue possesses. Many people prefer a true wood to wood joint; however, these are not that common. Most pool cues use a type of joint that contains metal shafts, although plastic may also be used. Ideally, you want to look for a cue that has a solid feel to it regardless of what kind of joint it has.

See this article for a detailed description of the different types of pool cue joints.

Pool Cue Vibration

It is also important to look for a cue that does not have a lot of vibration to it. You can check that by holding the cue in one hand halfway down the bottom section and hitting it with the bottom of your hand about halfway up the cue. If there is vibration, avoid it and get another cue.

Pool Cue Price

Finally, the price is a definite factor for most folks when picking out a new pool cue. If you’re looking for a quality cue you need to be prepared to pay for it. Generally, you cannot purchase a good quality cue for anywhere under $100. Expect to pay at least around $125 to get a cue that is even playable. Cues in this price range are a good choice for beginners. If you’re looking to step it up a notch, be prepared to pay around $200; perhaps slightly more. This will get you a high quality cue but still not top of the line. For a top of the line cue, expect to pay at least $400 and possibly up to $1000 or more.

Put all of the factors together and you should have a decent enough knowledge to know what type of pool cue to buy.

What Kind of Pool Cue Should I Buy?

  • Title: What Kind of Pool Cue Should I Buy?
  • Author: (Billiards Forum)
  • Published: 2/23/2019 1:35:44 PM
  • Last Updated: 2/23/2019 3:25:55 PM
  • Last Updated By: billiardsforum

What Kind of Pool Cue Should I Buy?

What Kind of Pool Cue Should I Buy? Comments

There are not yet any comments. Please post one below. All comments are moderated.

Reply and share your comments below:

upload a photo or document

use plain text or markdown syntax only