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Chalk on Pool Cue Shaft


Chalk on Pool Cue Shaft

I just bought a new Viking F-60 pool cue.

I was playing with it to get used to it and when I chalk it up I always get some chalk on the shaft (I guess I chalk funny).

I want to keep the pool cue shaft clean and I've tried wiping the dirty part with a damp towel then quickly drying it off with a dry towel but now the part I just washed feels different then the rest of the stick.

Did I take the finish off? If so, is there a way to put it back on?

Chalk on Pool Cue Shaft

Replies & Comments

  1. leebilliardsforum on 1/7/2007 2:03:32 PM

    Ouch - its going to be impossible to get a consistent feel all over if you just try and re-treat that one section. To achieve this, you'll need to re-finish the whole bottom half of the cue.

    There is a product that may interest you; I read about something called SlipSticâ„¢ Cleaner-Conditioner in an all-in-one package. It is apparently "A genuine leather burnish captures excess conditioner for your convenience during play. No more hassles of constant cleaning and smoothing again." Not sure how well it works though.

    I've also contacted three custom pool cue manufacturers that we're partnered with, to ask them about the problem you have. I'll post back as soon as they respond.

  2. leebilliardsforum on 1/7/2007 2:10:47 PM

    Ouch - its going to be impossible to get a consistent feel all over if you just try and re-treat that one section. To achieve this, you'll need to re-finish the whole bottom half of the cue.

    There is a product that may interest you; I read about something called SlipSticâ„¢ Cleaner-Conditioner in an all-in-one package. It is apparently "A genuine leather burnish captures excess conditioner for your convenience during play. No more hassles of constant cleaning and smoothing again." Not sure how well it works though.

    I've also contacted three custom pool cue manufacturers that we're partnered with, to ask them about the problem you have. I'll post back as soon as they respond.

  3. leekyle on 1/7/2007 7:01:14 PM

    I doubt that you removed the finish with just water, some people like to burnish there shaft (rubbing a piece of leather to smooth the pores in the wood) I've never tried using a "magic eraser" but some swear by it. Myself I'm not a fan of products because I think in some cases you're leaving just as much junk that you take off. The best thing I've used is a damp towel (a white one) steamed in the microwave (20 seconds or so).

  4. leebilliardsforum on 1/8/2007 11:57:22 PM

    Here is the opinion and advice of Ronnie over at QuePerfect Custom cues. He has graciously taken his time out to answer this one. His reply is a little harsh, but hey, he's passionate about what he does. He says:

    Cleaning the ferrule is a futile activity. Why try to clean the toilet paper after using it? You cannot possibly keep the ferrule clean anyhow. Just be concerned how the cue plays, not how it looks.

    What you have done is to get water into the wood pores of your shaft. This water has caused the wood to swell some and caused some minute fibers to break loose some and "Fuzz up".

    There is no finish on the business end of the shaft to put back on. If you insist on continuing being so worried about how the cue looks, instead of how it plays you will end up ruining that shaft and may already have.

    To get the fuzz and swelling off just take 2,000 grit sand paper and rub it about 5 seconds.

    From now polish your cue shaft with a 100% pure carnuba wax (that does not clean as it polishes, because the cleaning kind has volcanic ash in it and will eventually dull and ruin your cue.) and do the whole cue with the same stuff.

  5. leebilliardsforum on 1/8/2007 11:59:29 PM

    He replied again shortly after to add...

    Never put water on your shaft. Sometimes certain techniques used by cue repairmen and cuemakers require water, but they know what they are doing, and you do not.

    Allow the oils from your hands and from the carnuba polish to be the only liquids placed by you upon the exposed wood of your shafts.

    Sometimes a Pro may wipe his or her shaft with a damp cloth, but their cloth does not have anywhere near the water you used...and their shafts have been used for hundreds anbd hundreds of hours and have the wood sealed with all kinds of polishes and oils from so many hours of use.

    I do not recomend using a damp cloth at all and whom ever did recomend this hopes he would benifit from the extra business when their shafts became fuzzed up from the water.

  6. leepatrickp123495 on 2/16/2009 10:21:41 AM

    Pool player,

    What i did was rub ball cleaner on my ferrule and it was good as new.Ball cleaners are made to take out chalk and make shine.So why not!LOL.Im not trying to sound like an expert.Just trying to help.

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Chalk on Pool Cue Shaft

  • Title: Chalk on Pool Cue Shaft
  • Author:
  • Published: 12/29/2006 7:02:57 PM
  • Last Updated: 11/16/2016 11:14:47 AM
  • Last Updated By: billiardsforum (Billiards Forum)