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Written Rules for Coin Operated Pool Tables?


Written Rules for Coin Operated Pool Tables?

Are there any written Coin operated pool rules which back up, or state what should occur if, any of the following coin-op pool situations arise?

  1. On the break if eight is made then the game is won, unless they also scratch then it is a loss.
  2. On the break if solids or stripes are made then shooter has what is made. If both are made then he shoots again and table is open till a called shot is made.
  3. Shots have to be called including off opponents ball.
  4. The only fouls are cue ball fouls and placed in Kitchen. (not ball in hand)
  5. The 8 ball has to go in the called pocket clean.

In Florida, these are the rules that are commonly used when playing pool in bars on coin operated billiard tables where you can't spot balls, etc.

I have been unable to locate any references to these "house coin-op rules" to post officially during in house pool tournaments.

This question relates to the following billiard rules:

Written Rules for Coin Operated Pool Tables?

Replies & Comments

  1. Answerdavequickshot on 5/3/2010 2:48:07 PM

    There are no coin operated rules per say. The rules of the game being played are usually in force. 8,9, or what ever game is being played. Many bars have a few side rules and they are made by the house.

  2. AnswerdaveMitch Alsup on 5/3/2010 3:50:15 PM
    1. on the break if eight is made then the game is won, unless they also scratch then it is a loss.

      Correct.

    2. On the break if solids or stripes are made then shooter has what is made. If both are made then he shoots again and table is open till a called shot is made.

      Not always. At our local bars, the rule is that the table is open after the break. However on tourneyment night what you state is correct, except that if more than one are made, the shooter has the option to choose either set (before shooting his next shot).

    3. Shots have to be called including off opponents ball.

      This is known as "no slop" rules, and can have minor variations where you don't have to call grazing of the rail just in front of the pocket,... But this rule is typical of pay machines, just make sure you write down what must be called and what does not have to be.

    4. the only fouls are cue ball fouls and placed in Kitchen. (not ball in hand)

      We generally don't even call cue ball rules. That is, one can displace the CB and restore it to where it was and continue to shoot. But, generally correct. Remember it is the opponent that has choice as to replace the ball or leave it where it lies.

    5. The 8 ball has to go in the called pocket clean.

      We play you have to call the 8-ball as above in "no slop"; however, on tourney night the 8-ball does have to go in clean.

    6. Jumps and Massés

      Legal normal nights, not legal tourney nights. Both the "really legal above the equator" jumps and the scooping jumps are legal. Might want to have a discussion before mandating or banning either.

      Massés (curving the CB) are generally legal. Even if big massés are banned, gentle curves around an interfering ball should be legal, as these cause less damage to the clothe than draw shots when the CB is on the rail. But get bar-wide agreement before casting in stone. Tips impacting the clothe should be illegal, however, so if you allow massés, you need to know how to perform them.

    7. Time

      Real tourneys have time clocks (30-45 seconds per shot) and 2 minutes at the start of the game. These are unenforcible when the next shooter in line is in line at the bar for his next pitcher,... So, be nice and accomodate the activities of the establishment.

    8. Coaching

      Real tourneys ban coaching. Bar rules should allow coaching under the premis that the lesserlings will enjoy the game more, come back more often, and play more; if they can be helped along the way. Its good for you, good for them, and good for the bar. Win, win, win. Tourneyments in a bar goes back to the no coaching rules.

    9. Sportsmanship

      In real playing situations, the opposing player and everyone associated with him must remain quiet durring your shot. In many bar situations this is impossible to regulate. however, since it is unlikely to be shooting on the cloks, just wait until they quiet down to shoot--even if it takes 30 minutes for a single shot.

      I have taken my seat while the opponents were bantering about. When one approaches the table I inform them that it is still my shot. When they ask why I am not shooting, I will tell them I have the right to shoot in quiet. This drives them crazy, untl they run out of patience at the 5-7 minute mark and allow the game to continue. They will shut up if you hold your ground (nicely).

    10. Equipment

      Allow any reasonable cues and devices to be used--especially if the bar has limited room for full use of standard length cues.

  3. AnswerdaveAnswerdave on 5/4/2010 10:30:48 AM

    Mitch, Thank you for your reply.

    What I meant by cue ball fouls was scratches. To create these rules on paper, should I use the posted coin operated rules and modify them or is there a set of rules already written? Is there a no slop rules written anywhere?

  4. AnswerdaveMitch Alsup on 5/4/2010 4:22:59 PM

    The best option with respect to the rules, is to download the BCA (or APA) rules and then edit them onto a sheet of paper and laminate.

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Written Rules for Coin Operated Pool Tables?

  • Title: Written Rules for Coin Operated Pool Tables?
  • Author: (David Miskie)
  • Published: 5/3/2010 2:21:35 PM
  • Last Updated: 10/26/2016 1:50:01 PM
  • Last Updated By: billiardsforum (Billiards Forum)